CORAL Magazine New Issue “SPINY WONDERS” Inside Look

21 Feb, 2020

Cover of CORAL Magazine Volume 17, Issue 2 – SPINY WONDERS – March/April 2020. On the cover: Harlequin Shrimp feeding on sea star. Gary Bell/Oceanwide Images. Background: Fluorescing Ricordea yuma. Werner Fiedler.

Cover of CORAL Magazine Volume 17, Issue 2 – SPINY WONDERS – March/April 2020. On the cover: Harlequin Shrimp feeding on a sea star. Gary Bell/Oceanwide Images. Background: Fluorescing Ricordea yuma. Werner Fiedler.

Go to the Digital EditionNow Live for Immediate Reading

The March/April 2020 Issue of CORAL is printed and on its way from New Hampshire to subscribers and leading local retail shops—on sale March 5th, 2020, at the best marine aquarium retail stores everywhere.

Readers of the Digital Edition can have immediate access—just log in here: CORAL DIGITAL EDITION

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HEREWITH, a sampling of articles and opening pages for readers curious about what the issue will bring.


Table of Contents for the March/April 2020 issue of CORAL Magazine. You can view this TOC online.

Table of Contents for the March/April 2020 issue of CORAL Magazine. You can view this TOC online.

 

"I write this for the 120th edition of KORALLE, the German edition of CORAL, which is now 20 years old and, I hope, still full of the animals, the beauty, and the challenges that inspire us. Happy reading!" - Daniel Knop

“I write this for the 120th edition of KORALLE, the German edition of CORAL, which is now 20 years old and, I hope, still full of the animals, the beauty, and the challenges that inspire us. Happy reading!” – Daniel Knop

 

CORAL Editor-in-Chief James Lawrence highlights a developing program that all readers will be excited about. "Saving species in an unfolding era of violent weather, climate change, and worldwide flooding is literally a challenge of biblical proportions, but a small group of scientists and protectors of the Great Barrier Reef have set out to create a virtual perpetual ark to save stony corals from potential extinction."

CORAL Editor James Lawrence points to a small group of scientists and protectors of the Great Barrier Reef who have set out to create a virtual perpetual ark to save stony corals from potential extinction.

 

 

Reef News presents findings and happenings of note in the marine world. In this issue: Coral Biobank Launched: Stockpiling Stony Coral Species for an Uncertain Future; Palatable Plastics: Why Corals Ingest Faux Plankton; To Know Me, Know My Microbes (investigating the role that a coral's microbial symbionts play in its adaptability).

Reef News presents findings and happenings of note in the marine world. In this issue: Coral Biobank Launched: Stockpiling Stony Coral Species for an Uncertain Future; Palatable Plastics: Why Corals Ingest Faux Plankton; To Know Me, Know My Microbes (investigating the role that a coral’s microbial symbionts play in its adaptability).

 

REEF VISIONS: A portfolio of extraordinary reef life spotted in the current aquarium trade. A stunning maricutlured Lemon-Lime Acropora millepora from Bali Aquarium, photographed by Vincent Chalias, ushers in the return of Indonesian corals and leads off this issue's highlights.

REEF VISIONS: A portfolio of extraordinary reef life spotted in the current aquarium trade. A stunning maricultured Lemon-Lime Acropora millepora from Bali Aquarium, photographed by Vincent Chalias, ushers in the return of Indonesian corals and leads off this issue’s highlights.

 

When we think about motile reef invertebrates, the iconic echinoderms quickly come to mind: the sea stars (Asteroidea), the brittle stars (Ophiuroidea), the sea urchins (Echinoidea), the feather stars (Crinoidea), and the sea cucumbers (Holothuroidea). This happens to be the largest phylum that is exclusively found in salt water, with no representatives in fresh water or on land. Learn more from Dr. Ronald Shimek in our feature coverage.

When we think about motile reef invertebrates, the iconic echinoderms quickly come to mind: the sea stars (Asteroidea), the brittle stars (Ophiuroidea), the sea urchins (Echinoidea), the feather stars (Crinoidea), and the sea cucumbers (Holothuroidea).

 

PENTARADIAL ORIGAMI, by Ronald L. Shimek, Ph.D., unfolds the mysteries of the echinoderms: the five-sided animals we know as starfish, brittle stars, serpent stars, sea urchins, sand dollars, sea cucumbers, and crinoids or feather stars.

PENTARADIAL ORIGAMI, by Ronald L. Shimek, Ph.D., unfolds the mysteries of the echinoderms: the five-sided animals we know as starfish, brittle stars, serpent stars, sea urchins, sand dollars, sea cucumbers, and crinoids or feather stars.

 

Gram for gram, the most notorious hunters in the sea might be the beautiful little Harlequin Shrimps. Small and deceptively attractive, these Indo-Pacific crustaceans are known to attack and incapacitate prey much larger than themselves, then slowly devour their still-living victims, piece by piece, over a period of days or even weeks. Matt Pedersen investigates the husbandry and breeding of Hymenocera picta.

Gram for gram, the most notorious hunters in the sea might be the beautiful little Harlequin Shrimps. Matt Pedersen investigates the husbandry and breeding of Hymenocera picta.

 

Travel with Werner Fiedler to experience wild reef fluorescence at the Selayar Dive Resort, situated on the east coast, well to the south, on the approximately 50-mile-long (80 km) island of Selayar, Indonesia.

Travel with Werner Fiedler to experience wild reef fluorescence on the approximately 50-mile-long (80 km) island of Selayar, Indonesia.

 

Experience the 450 gallon room divider reef of Matthias Kraus in this issue's AQUARIUM PORTRAIT.

Experience the 450-gallon room divider reef of Matthias Kraus in this issue’s AQUARIUM PORTRAIT.

 

The Multicolor Angelfish, Centropyge mutlicolor, is perhaps the most affordable of the deepwater pygmy angels available in the reef aquarium hobby. Daniel Knop shares techniques to be successful with an angelfish that isn't necessarily suited for the beginner.

The Multicolor Angelfish, Centropyge mutlicolor, is perhaps the most affordable of the deepwater pygmy angels available in the reef aquarium hobby. Daniel Knop shares techniques to be successful with an angelfish that isn’t necessarily suited for the beginner.

 

Hybrid Lighting may just be the ideal solution for lighting some reef aquariums, capitalizing on the unique benefits of both LED and T5 fluorescent aquarium lighting. Learn more in our REEFKEEPING 101 column.

Hybrid Lighting may just be the ideal solution for lighting some reef aquariums, because it capitalizes on the unique benefits of both LED and T5 fluorescent aquarium lighting. Learn more in Daniel Knop’s REEFKEEPING 101 column.

 

Find a directory of destination aquarium retailers with outstanding livestock, as well as your source for current and hard-to-find back issues of CORAL Magazine! You can view our sources list online anytime.

Find a directory of destination aquarium retailers with outstanding livestock, as well as your source for current and hard-to-find back issues of CORAL Magazine! You can view our sources list online anytime.

 

After 20 months of closure, coral farmers and exporters in Indonesia have finally been permitted to deliver a fresh influx of Indonesian corals to the world. But what will happen when the first approved supply of stock runs out? Coral farmer Vincent Chalias of Bali Aquarium offers a cautious insight, getting you up to speed on the history, and uncertain future, of Indonesia's trade in corals for the marine aquarium market.

After 20 months of closure, coral farmers and exporters in Indonesia have finally been permitted to deliver a fresh influx of Indonesian corals to the world. Coral farmer Vincent Chalias of Bali Aquarium offers a cautious insight on the uncertain future of Indonesia’s trade in corals for the marine aquarium market.

 


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About the author

Matt Pedersen

Matt Pedersen is a Sr. Editor and Associate Publisher with Reef To Rainforest Media, LLC & CORAL Magazines, and is a Sr. Editor and Publishing Partner with Aquatic Media Press, LLC & AMAZONAS Magazine. Matt has kept aquariums for 38 years, has worked in most facets of the aquarium trade, is an active aquarist and fish breeder (both marine and freshwater), and was recognized with the 2009 MASNA Award as the MASNA Aquarist of the Year.

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