CORAL Magazine New Issue “ENIGMATIC REEF SPECIES” Inside Look

07 Sep, 2018

The cover of CORAL Magazine Volume 15, Issue 5 – ENIGMATIC REEF SPECIES – September/October 2018. On the cover: Zanclus cornutus being cleaned by Labroides dimidiatus in aquarium of Heinz Hartwig, 2017. D. Knop. In the background: Melithaea sp. sea fan. W. Fiedler.

The cover of CORAL Magazine Volume 15, Issue 5 – ENIGMATIC REEF SPECIES – September/October 2018. On the cover: Zanclus cornutus being cleaned by Labroides dimidiatus in the aquarium of Heinz Hartwig, 2017. D. Knop. In the background: Melithaea sp. sea fan. W. Fiedler.

CORAL Magazine‘s 5th issue for 2018 deals with some of the most challenging marine aquarium fishes out there. What does “Expert Only” mean these days? Where has the bar moved? Scott Michael guides you through a modern look at the frontiers of marine fish husbandry. Ellen Thaler recounts the ongoing challenges of keeping the coveted Moorish Idol, Zanclus cornutus, our cover species. Something you read in this issue might be the key to your success with any number of hard-to-keep coral reef fish species, if you’re up for the challenge.

Beyond our cover feature, this new issue shares an in-depth look at the plating Montipora corals, as reported by CORAL contributor Felicia McCaulley. Daniel Knop shares the secrets of photographing stunning coral fluorescence using a black light (UV-A) flash. Jason Oneppo shares a history of brine shrimp on the 50th anniversary of San Francisco Bay Brand, while Samuel Nietzer considers viewing the Crown-of-Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster) not as a reef pest, but as an aquarium mascot. Furthemore, a wide array of exciting fish and corals await in our Rarities and Reef Notes columns.

The magazine is printed and on its way to subscribers, local aquarium shops, and select bookstores—on sale September 4th, 2018, at the best marine aquarium retail stores and leading Barnes & Noble stores everywhere.

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HEREWITH, a sampling of articles and opening pages for readers curious about what the issue will bring.


The Table of Contents for the September/October 2018 edition of CORAL Magazine, ENIGMATIC REEF SPECIES.

The Table of Contents for the September/October 2018 edition of CORAL Magazine, ENIGMATIC REEF SPECIES. You can view an online copy of the Table of Contents here.

 

"Regulating nutrients involves a lot more than just limiting nitrate and phosphate. The nutrient budget in a marine ecosystem is far more complex," writes Daniel Knop, introducing the work of Professor Carlo Kramer, whose reef tank is featured in this issue's Aquarium Portrait (page 83).

“Regulating nutrients involves a lot more than just limiting nitrate and phosphate. The nutrient budget in a marine ecosystem is far more complex,” writes Daniel Knop, introducing the work of Professor Carlo Kramer, whose reef tank is featured in this issue’s Aquarium Portrait (page 83).

 

Following the launch of our improved digital delivery platforms earlier this year, we're pleased to share a video first for CORAL’s Digital Edition: The Golden Fairy Basslet (Gramma dejongi) in the Wild, as shared and shown by Bruce Carlson & Marj Awai.

Following the launch of our improved digital delivery platforms earlier this year, we’re pleased to share a video first for CORAL’s Digital Edition: The Golden Fairy Basslet (Gramma dejongi) in the Wild, as shared and shown by Bruce Carlson and Marj Awai.

 

Send in the Drones: New Tools for Coral Reef Research; Hippocampus japapigu: the Newest Pygmy Seahorse; Evolution—In the beginning was the sponge; Swiss chefs must stun lobsters before cooking; learn about all these captivating stories in our Reef News column.

Send in the Drones: New Tools for Coral Reef Research; Hippocampus japapigu: the Newest Pygmy Seahorse; Evolution—In the beginning was the sponge; Swiss chefs must stun lobsters before cooking. Learn about all these captivating stories in our Reef News column.

 

CORAL Magazine's RARITIES column returns this issue with new & noteworthy current and recent offerings from marine livestock sources.

CORAL Magazine’s RARITIES column returns this issue with new and noteworthy current and recent offerings from marine livestock sources.

 

Introducing our cover feature, Scott Michael writes, "While there are literally hundreds of fish species commonly available to marine aquarists, not all of these fishes are created equal when it comes to their suitability for the home aquarium." Find out what makes some species difficult to keep in aquariums, in "For Experts Only."

Introducing our cover feature, Scott Michael writes, “While there are literally hundreds of fish species commonly available to marine aquarists, not all of these fishes are created equal when it comes to their suitability for the home aquarium.” Find out what makes some species difficult to keep in aquariums, in “For Experts Only.”

 

"Stamps of Caution," by Scott Michael, introduces 50 fishes, many of which are not uncommon in the aquarium hobby, that often catch our eye but that demand expert care—and that are best avoided by novice or casual marine hobbyists.

“Stamps of Caution,” by Scott Michael, introduces 50 fishes, many of which are not uncommon in the aquarium hobby, that often catch our eye but that demand expert care—and that are best avoided by novice or casual marine hobbyists.

 

Ellen Thaler shares her heartbreaks and successes keeping one of the most coveted expert-only marine aquarium fishes in existence, the Moorish Idol (Zanclus cornutus). Required reading (we think) for anyone attempting to keep this demanding species!

Ellen Thaler shares her heartbreaks and successes keeping one of the most coveted expert-only marine aquarium fishes in existence, the Moorish Idol (Zanclus cornutus). Required reading (we think) for anyone attempting to keep this demanding species!

 

CORAL contributor Felicia McCaulley, along with the support of many talented photographers and coral culturists, presents an unprecedented modern look at the “Monti Caps” (Montipora capricornis).

CORAL contributor Felicia McCaulley, along with the support of many talented photographers and coral culturists, presents an unprecedented modern look at the “Monti Caps” (Montipora capricornis).

 

In this issue's AQUARIUM PORTRAIT, Professor Carlo Kraemer shares his living room lessons in contemporary reefkeeping.

In this issue’s AQUARIUM PORTRAIT, Professor Carlo Kraemer shares his living room lessons in contemporary reefkeeping.

 

Daniel Knop's ongoing series covering aquarium photography brings us the latest approaches to capturing coral fluorescence using special UV-A flash equipment.

Daniel Knop’s ongoing series covering aquarium photography brings us the latest approaches to capturing coral fluorescence using special UV-A flash equipment.

 

In a retrospective look at Brine Shrimp spanning nearly a century, Jason Oneppo looks at the industry that Artemia built, as San Francisco Bay Brand Celebrates 50 Years: 1968–2018.

In a retrospective look at Brine Shrimp spanning nearly a century, Jason Oneppo looks at the industry that Artemia built, as San Francisco Bay Brand Celebrates 50 Years: 1968–2018.

 

Not sure where to find your next fish or coral? Check out the very best local fish shops around the county in our Sources directory. If they're smart enough to carry CORAL Magazine in their shops, you know they value the same things that make you a CORAL reader!

Not sure where to find your next fish or coral? Check out the very best local fish shops around the county in our Sources directory. If they’re smart enough to carry CORAL Magazine in their shops, you know they value the same things that make you a CORAL reader!

 

Crown-of-Thorns Starfi shes are a serious threat to wild stony coral populations in many places. But they can be kept in the aquarium, and their long-term maintenance may help us better understand their rampant proliferation in the wild. Samuel Neitzer investigates, in our REEF STEWARDSHIP column.

Crown-of-Thorns Starfishes are a serious threat to wild stony coral populations in many places. But they can be kept in the aquarium, and their long-term maintenance may help us better understand their rampant proliferation in the wild. Samuel Neitzer investigates in our REEF STEWARDSHIP column.

 


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About the author

Matt Pedersen
Matt Pedersen

Matt Pedersen is a Sr. Editor and Associate Publisher with Reef To Rainforest Media, LLC, including AMAZONAS & CORAL Magazines. Matt has kept aquariums for 36 years, has worked in most facets of the aquarium trade, is an active aquarist and fish breeder (both marine and freshwater), and was recognized with the 2009 MASNA Award as the MASNA Aquarist of the Year.

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