World Aquarium News
Abstract The world's oceans are subject to the influence of climate change at all latitudes and depths. There is a growing body of literature on the responses of species to climate change, which has a strong deterministic component indicating that responses can be predicted. At the same time, advances in oceanographic data acquisition and modeling have facilitated the identification of potential climate change refugia. The Convention on Biological Diversity's “Voluntary Specific Workplan on Biodiversity in Cold‐Water Areas within the Jurisdictional Scope of the Convention” explicitly calls for the identification and protection of refugia in cold‐water areas. We propose adding “Climate Change [...]
Tue, Aug 13, 2019
Source Conservation Letters
Scientists have completed a landmark study on how to save coral reefs in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. [...]
Mon, Aug 12, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Marine heatwaves are a much bigger threat to coral reefs than previously thought, research revealing a previously unrecognized impact of climate change on coral reefs has shown. [...]
Thu, Aug 08, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Corals have been dominant framework builders of reef structures for millions of years. Ocean acidification, which is intensifying as climate change progresses, is increasingly affecting coral growth. Scientists have now answered some questions regarding whether and how corals can adapt to these changes by having gained important insights into the regulatory processes of coral calcification. [...]
Thu, Aug 08, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Researchers have proposed a new genus of bacteria that flourishes when coral reefs become polluted, siphoning energy from the corals and making them more susceptible to disease. [...]
Thu, Aug 08, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Abstract The Convention on Biological Diversity and the Nagoya Protocol display a broad international consensus for biodiversity conservation and equitable benefit sharing. Yet, the Aichi biodiversity targets show a lack of progress and thus indicate a need for additional action such as enhanced and better targeted financial resource mobilization. To date, no global financial burden‐sharing instrument has been proposed. Developing a global‐scale financial mechanism to support biodiversity conservation through intergovernmental transfers, we simulate three allocation designs: ecocentric, socioecological, and anthropocentric. We analyze the corresponding incentives needed to reach the Aichi target of terrestrial protected area coverage by 2020. Here we show [...]
Wed, Aug 07, 2019
Source Conservation Letters
After years of federally mandated protection, scientists see signs that this once ecologically fertile area known as the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain is making a comeback. [...]
Wed, Aug 07, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Young giant clams get necessary symbiotic algae from the feces of their parents, updating the age-old adage: one clam's trash is another clam's treasure. [...]
Wed, Aug 07, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
A phenomenon that makes coral spawn more than once a year is improving the resilience of the Great Barrier Reef. The discovery was made by researchers investigating whether corals that split their spawning over multiple months are more successful at spreading their offspring across different reefs. [...]
Tue, Aug 06, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Abstract Most of Earth's biodiversity is found in 36 biodiversity hotspots, yet less than 10% natural intact vegetation remains. We calculated models projecting the future state of most of these hotspots for the year 2050, based on future climatic and agroeconomic pressure. Our models project an increasing demand for agricultural land resulting in the conversion of >50% of remaining natural intact vegetation in about one third of all hotspots, and in 2–6 hotspots resulting from climatic pressure. This confirms that, in the short term, habitat loss is of greater concern than climate change for hotspots and their biodiversity. Hotspots are most [...]
Mon, Aug 05, 2019
Source Conservation Letters
Scientists have created the world's first computer model to predict the movements of baby coral trout across the Great Barrier Reef. The models are validated by in-depth fieldwork and genetic tracking, and will help managers decide which areas need the most protection to ensure future adult populations of coral trout. [...]
Thu, Aug 01, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Volunteer snorkelers and scuba divers have been helping capture images of reef manta rays to better protect the threatened species. Project Manta relied on these citizen scientists to photograph or video individual reef manta rays (Mobula alfredi) across Australia's east coast. [...]
Wed, Jul 31, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Abstract The dearth of ecological data from protected areas at relevant scales challenges conservation practice in West Africa. We conducted the first camera survey for Burkina Faso and Niger to elucidate interactions between resource users and mammals in the largest protected area complex in West Africa (W‐Arly‐Pendjari, WAP). We differentiated direct (e.g., poaching) and indirect (e.g., domestic animals) human activities to determine their effects on species richness, composition, and behavior. Livestock was the dominant human pressure while gathering was the most prevalent direct human activity. Human pressure did not influence species richness or composition, but reduced mammal activity with greater consequences [...]
Mon, Jul 29, 2019
Source Conservation Letters
Researchers investigated the interplay between corals and bacteria under changing environmental conditions. Their research results were published in the current issue of the journal Nature Communications. [...]
Thu, Jul 25, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Abstract In 2014, the International Union for Conservation of Nature adopted the Red List of Ecosystems (RLE) criteria as the global standard for assessing risks to terrestrial, marine, and freshwater ecosystems. Five years on, it is timely to ask what impact this new initiative has had on ecosystem management and conservation. In this policy perspective, we use an impact evaluation framework to distinguish the outputs, outcomes, and impacts of the RLE since its inception. To date, 2,821 ecosystems in 100 countries have been assessed following the RLE protocol. Systematic assessments are complete or underway in 21 countries and two continental regions [...]
Wed, Jul 24, 2019
Source Conservation Letters