World Aquarium News
New research shows that long-term changes in diseases in ocean species coincides with decades of widespread environmental change. [...]
Wed, Oct 09, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Among birds, the practice of laying eggs in other birds' nests is surprisingly common. This phenomenon, known as brood parasitism, was unknown in coral reef fish because most marine fish don't provide any parental care at all. Now, however, biologists studying an unusual kind of coral reef fish that does care for its young have found that, sure enough, other fish are taking advantage of this to get free parental care for their offspring. [...]
Wed, Oct 09, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Abstract The importance of expert input to spatial conservation prioritization outcomes is poorly understood. We quantified the impacts of refinements made during consultation with experts on spatial conservation prioritization of Christmas Island. There was just 0.57 correlation between the spatial conservation priorities before and after consultation, bottom ranked areas being most sensitive to changes. The inclusion of a landscape condition layer was the most significant individual influence. Changes (addition, removal, modification) to biodiversity layers resulted in a combined 0.2 reduction in correlation between initial and final solutions. Representation of rare species in top ranked areas was much greater after expert consultation; [...]
Thu, Oct 03, 2019
Source Conservation Letters
A new study revealed a more complex view than current standard predictions of coral bleaching events caused primarily by heat stress; rather, the scientists found that bleaching is driven by a variety of stressors, and each region responds differently. [...]
Wed, Oct 02, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
A non-invasive approach could help marine biologists monitor coral health in the face of climate change. [...]
Wed, Oct 02, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Corals exude chemical defenses against bacteria, but when heated in the lab, those defenses lost much potency against a pathogen common in coral bleaching. There's hope: A key coral's defense was heartier when that coral was taken from an area where fishing was banned and plenty of fish were left to eat away seaweed that was overgrowing corals elsewhere. [...]
Wed, Oct 02, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
New research highlights two factors that play a critical role in supporting reef fish populations and - ultimately - creating conditions that are more favorable for the growth of both coral reefs and seagrass. [...]
Tue, Oct 01, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Abstract Sustaining human well‐being is intimately linked to maintaining productive and healthy ecosystems. Avoiding trade‐offs and fostering co‐benefits is however challenging. Here, we present an operational approach that integrates biodiversity conservation, human development, and natural resource management by (1) examining resource and resource user interactions through the lens of social–ecological vulnerability (i.e., encompassing exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity); (2) identifying “ecocentric” and “sociocentric” interventions that directly address the ecological or social sources of vulnerability; (3) prioritizing those expected to yield co‐benefits and minimize trade‐offs; and (4) selecting interventions that are best suited to the broader local context. Application of this approach [...]
Tue, Oct 01, 2019
Source Conservation Letters
Abstract In urbanized societies that are increasingly disconnected from nature, communicating ecological and species awareness is crucial to revert the global environmental crisis. However, our understanding of the effectiveness of this process is limited. We present a framework for describing how such awareness may be transferred and test it on the popular BBC show Planet Earth 2 by analyzing Twitter and Wikipedia big data activity. Despite lacking explicit conservation themes, this show generated species awareness, stimulating audience engagement for information at magnitudes comparable to those achieved by other conservation‐focused campaigns. Results suggest that natural history films can provide vicarious connections to [...]
Mon, Sep 30, 2019
Source Conservation Letters
An in-depth look at Australia's Great Barrier Reef over the past 91 years concludes that since 1928 intertidal communities have experienced major phase-shifts as a result of local and global environmental change, leaving few signs that reefs will return to their initial state in the near future. The long-term implications of these changes highlight the importance of avoiding phase shifts in coral reefs which may take many decades to repair, if at all. [...]
Fri, Sep 27, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
The living tissue on corals protects their skeleton from dissolving as a result of ocean acidification according to an in situ experiment on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. [...]
Thu, Sep 26, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Scientists have seen for the first time how corals collaborate with other microscopic life to build and grow. [...]
Tue, Sep 24, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Abstract In October 2016, the international community made history by adopting the world's largest marine protected area in the Ross Sea, Antarctica—by consensus. Achieving this feat required trade‐offs and compromise among the 24‐Member States (plus the European Union) comprising the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources. The process took 5 years of intense international negotiations and more than 10 years of scientific planning. Based on interviews with national delegations and other stakeholders, 5 years of participatory observation of Commission meetings (2012–2016), and analysis of hundreds of documents, we present unique insights that explain the conditions that stalled or [...]
Fri, Sep 20, 2019
Source Conservation Letters
Scientists say bolder actions to protect the world's coral reefs will benefit all ecosystems, human livelihoods and improve food security. [...]
Wed, Sep 18, 2019
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Abstract The emerging fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal), is a significant conservation threat to salamander biodiversity in Europe, although its potential to affect North American species is poorly understood. We tested the susceptibility of two genera (Eurycea and Pseudotriton) and three populations of lungless salamanders (Plethodontidae) to Bsal. All species became infected with Bsal and two (Pseudotriton ruber and Eurycea wilderae) developed chytridiomycosis. We also documented that susceptibility of E. wilderae differed among populations. Regardless of susceptibility, all species reduced feeding when exposed to Bsal at the highest zoospore dose, and P. ruber and one population of E. wilderae used cover [...]
Tue, Sep 17, 2019
Source Conservation Letters