World Aquarium News
One of the largest global mass extinctions did not fundamentally change marine ecosystems, scientists have found. [...]
Fri, Oct 20, 2017
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
A new study has found that conserving fish diversity in Madagascar's coral reef systems may depend on maintaining fish biomass above critical levels. [...]
Thu, Oct 19, 2017
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Scientists have discovered that Earth's sea level did not rise steadily when the planet's glaciers last melted during a period of global warming; rather, sea level rose sharply in punctuated bursts. [...]
Thu, Oct 19, 2017
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
A new study based on the first global survey of marine life by scuba divers has provided fresh insights into how climate change is affecting the distribution of marine life. The research predicts that as the oceans warm fish -- which appear to be superior predators in warm water -- will extend their ranges away from the equator and cause a decline in the diversity of invertebrates such as crabs, lobsters, sea urchins and whelks. [...]
Wed, Oct 18, 2017
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Resilient species of coral can move to inhospitable areas and lay the foundations for new reefs, a study shows. [...]
Wed, Oct 18, 2017
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Abstract In coral reef conservation and management, the prevailing metric of reef health is percent coral cover, a measurement commonly used with the assumption that each unit of live coral tissue has equivalent ecological value. Here we show that the reproductive output of a coral population is not proportional to the cover of coral present. Instead, when compared to declining populations nearby, high cover coral populations produced up to four times more larvae per square centimeter of tissue, resulting in up to 200 times higher larval production per square meter of reef. Importantly, corals that produced more larvae did not produce [...]
Wed, Oct 18, 2017
Source Conservation Letters
Healthy coral populations can produce up to 200 times more juvenile corals than degraded coral populations nearby, according to a new study. [...]
Wed, Oct 18, 2017
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Abstract Marine reserves are a commonly applied conservation tool, but their size is often chosen based on considerations of socioeconomic rather than ecological impact. Here, we use a simple individual-based model together with the latest empirical information on home ranges, densities and schooling behaviour in 66 coral reef fishes to quantify the conservation effectiveness of various reserve sizes. We find that standard reserves with a diameter of 1–2 km can achieve partial protection (≥50% of the maximum number of individuals) of 56% of all simulated species. Partial protection of the most important fishery species, and of species with diverse functional roles, [...]
Tue, Oct 17, 2017
Source Conservation Letters
The more than 13 trillion gallons of floodwater from Hurricane Harvey have created a massive plume of freshwater in the Gulf of Mexico that is threatening the coral reefs of the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary about 100 miles offshore of Galveston. [...]
Mon, Oct 16, 2017
Source Coral Reef News from Science Daily
Abstract Conservation practitioners face complex challenges due to resource limitations, biological and socioeconomic trade-offs, involvement of diverse interest groups, and data deficiencies. To help address these challenges, there are a growing number of frameworks for systematic decision making. Three prominent frameworks are structured decision making, systematic conservation prioritization, and systematic reviews. These frameworks have numerous conceptual linkages, and offer rigorous and transparent solutions to conservation problems. However, they differ in their assumptions and applicability. Here, we provide guidance on how to choose among these frameworks for solving conservation problems, and how to identify less rigorous techniques when time or data availability [...]
Mon, Oct 16, 2017
Source Conservation Letters
Abstract Using choice modelling we explore willingness to pay (WTP) for rhino horn among existing and potential future consumers in Vietnam. We find that wild-sourced horn, harvested humanely from the least rare species, is the most highly valued product. Furthermore, consumers are willing to pay less for rhino horn products under a scenario where international trade is legalised compared to the current situation of illegal trade. We discuss the potential implications of our findings on rhino poaching and international trade policy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved [...]
Mon, Oct 16, 2017
Source Conservation Letters
Thu, Oct 12, 2017
Source Conservation Letters
Abstract Thousands of small populations are at increased risk of extinction because genetics and evolutionary biology are not well-integrated into conservation planning–a major lost opportunity for effective actions. We propose that if the risk of outbreeding depression is low, the default should be to evaluate restoration of gene flow to small inbred populations of diploid outbreeding organisms that were isolated by human activities within the last 500 years, rather than inaction. We outline the elements of a scientific-based genetic management policy for fragmented populations of plants and animals, and discuss the reasons why the current default policy is, inappropriately, inaction. [...]
Wed, Oct 11, 2017
Source Conservation Letters
Abstract Conservation management is strongly shaped by the interpretation of population trends. In the Serengeti ecosystem, Tanzania, aerial total counts indicate a striking increase in elephant abundance compared to all previous censuses. We developed a simple age-structured population model to guide interpretation of this reported increase, focusing on three possible causes: (1) in situ population growth, (2) immigration from Kenya, and (3) differences in counting methodologies over time. No single cause, nor the combination of two causes, adequately explained the observed population growth. Under the assumptions of maximum in situ growth and detection bias of 12.7% in previous censuses, conservative estimates [...]
Tue, Oct 10, 2017
Source Conservation Letters
Abstract In February 2014 India's 14th Finance Commission added forest cover to the formula that determines the amount of tax revenue the central government distributes annually to each of India's 29 states. The Government of India estimates that from 2015–2019 it will distribute $6.9-12 billion per year to states in proportion to their 2013 forest cover, amounting to around $174-303 per hectare of forest per year. Assuming that contemporary forest cover will remain an element of the formula beyond 2020, Indian states now have a sizeable new fiscal incentive to protect and restore forests, contributing to the achievement of India's climate [...]
Mon, Oct 09, 2017
Source Conservation Letters