AMAZONAS Video: Spring Brings Color to North America

06 May, 2014

Native fish keepers and enthusiasts are getting big treats as spring swings into high gear (although you wouldn’t know it with snow still on the ground in Duluth, MN where Senior Editor Matt Pedersen resides).

Video shared last week by the Tennessee Aquarium proves once again why aquarists shouldn’t be dismissive of our native species (be sure to select the HD options).

In a stunning show of color and behavior, a shoal of Rainbow Shiners (Notropis chrosomus) are seen spawning over the nest of a Bluehead Chub (Nocomis leptocephalus). Native to the waters of the Mobile Bay river drainage in Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee, this flashy species reaches lengths of 2-3 inches (5-8 cm) and is popular among the relatively  few aquarists who keep American fishes.

According to information shared with the video, it was taken by Alex Huryn, a Biology Professor at the University of Alabama.  See the video description on YouTube for additional information.

Check the Tennessee Aquarium Youtube Channel for more videos, and learn more about their freshwater conservation efforts on their website.

As a general reminder, aquarists interested in obtaining and keeping native fishes should be sure to check with DNR regulations and obtain all necessary permissions and permits. We encourage readers interested in native fish keeping to join the North American Native Fishes Association.

Fishbase: Listing Notropis chrosomus

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About the author

Reef To Rainforest
Reef To Rainforest

Reef to Rainforest Media, LLC is the publisher of award-winning magazines and books in the fields of aquarium keeping, aquatics, and marine science. It is the English-language publisher of CORAL and AMAZONAS Magazines and is based in Shelburne, Vermont, USA.

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